Some DM central banks potentially undergoing a regime shift – trying to avoid mistakes of the previous cycle when funding costs undershooting nominal return expectations for too long led to a leveraged-funded boom and capital misallocation, eventually unleashing a substantial deflationary shock – stand in contrast to falling energy prices in terms of market implications. Fed minutes confirmed anticipated hawkishness, leaving it only a question of time before the Fed starts its balance sheet reducing operations. The ECB will release its minutes today. More important will be ECB’s Weidmann’s speech on the future of the EUR.
Simultaneously, markets have to digest oversupply issues mainly affecting energy markets. Here, two big issues seem to stand out. First, OPEC’s inability to stay compliant with previously agreed production cuts and second, the US turning into an energy exporter following its shale energy revolution. Our US economist estimates business investment into US oil and gas drilling structures will increase by 80% in Q2and 25% in Q3,not only supporting US economic growth via its implementation, but also adding to the supply of energy into global markets. The FT is running an article today suggesting that LNG supply could increase by about 50% from 2015 to 2020. The US will turn into a leading LNG supplier. Australia has also now built up infrastructure to become a big LNG exporter. Our stance of selling currencies of traditional oil suppliers such as NOK and COP remains unchanged.
Declining energy costs have helped dampen inflation expectations and yesterday’s pause of US yields breaking higher despite increasing prospects of the Fed adding to future net bond supply should be attributed to oil prices showing their biggest decline since 25th May. The 5% oil price decline on 25th May set the starting point for a four-week decline, seeing Brent losing around 17%.
The exhibit illustrates the crucial position in which markets are currently progressing. We compare the 10-year US real yield with 10-year US breakeven. For risk markets to flourish, a combination of falling real rates and rising inflation expectations bodes well, explaining the strong equity performance witnessed in 2012/13. The reverse picture emerged in 2015, pushing share markets into two significant downward corrections in August 2015 and January 2016. The problem is that real rates have diverged from falling inflation expectations as they did in 2015. In this sense, falling energy prices are not risk supportive if not compensated by other reflationary forces. Yesterday, we mentioned rallying soft commodity prices. Today, we like to put our emphasis on growth data where we hope the upcoming June ISM non-manufacturing PMI and NFP report may allow the gap between US real rates and inflation expectations to narrow somewhat.

This analysis suggests that the risk outlook has turned more data sensitive. The Fed’s potential change of its reaction function – now increasingly emphasising buoyant financial conditions – and its readiness to look through current weak inflation data have created this new data sensitivity. The Q2 earnings reporting season starting tomorrow should help tip the balance in favour of risk appetite for now. We stay USDJPY bullish and use a near term setback to last Friday’s bullish 112.00 break point as a buying opportunity. The 10y JGB yield trading up to the unofficial 10bp upper ceiling due to a weak open market operation should not strengthen the JPY. There is no appetite within the BoJ for moving the signposts of its yield curve management policy yet. The MoF weekly security flow data showed foreign investors shying away from JPY money market investment, suggesting the USDJPY cross-currency basis should stop tightening, thus no longer reducing Japan-based investors’ hedging costs. Japanese investors reducing their FX hedge ratio should strengthen USDJPY.

GBP has corrected some of its recent gains in light of weak UK postelection PMI readings. Remember, post-Brexit UK soft indicators crashed for a couple of months before turning back up again. Anyhow, our GBP optimism finds its foundation in what we call ‘Brexit economics’ and the BoE reconsidering GBP weakness and its impact on the economy. So far, GBP weakness has been unable to lift net exports, but ithas undermined real disposable income via rising import prices. In short, GBP weakness has undermined living standards and with inflation above the BoE’s 2% target and its own staff projections, GBP stabilisation should now be on the BoE’s agenda. Talking up rate expectations is a sufficient tool to reach this target. With regard to the GBP outlook, we should not underestimate the growing influence of Chancellor Hammond within the Cabinet. There is a new openness to listen to businesses to reduce Brexit-related supply and market access restrictions, which should work in favour of the market which is still GBP short positioned. We hold our GBPUSD 1.32target.